Work with harmful materials. Shadow DOF. Developed from RAW; retouched with special care and attention; Small amount of grain added for best final impression. 16 bit Adobe RGB color profile.

Regulations and legislation for hazardous substances

Hazardous substances are commonly used in the workplace but what are the regulations and legislation that you should be following to make sure that any risk to your workers are reduced or dealt with.

When it comes to hazardous substances there are 3 main pieces of legislation that you should be aware of. These are as follows:

  • Control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH)
  • Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002 (DSEAR)
  • The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012

COSHH:

Work with harmful materials. Shadow DOF. Developed from RAW; retouched with special care and attention; Small amount of grain added for best final impression.

COSHH is the law that requires an employer to control substances that could be hazardous to health, and this includes nano-materials. Here are a list of bullet points you can work through to help with reducing risks involved with using hazardous substances:

  • finding out what the health hazards are
  • deciding how to prevent harm to health (risk assessment)
  • providing control measures to reduce harm to health
  • making sure they are used
  • keeping all control measures in good working order
  • providing information, instruction and training for employees and others
  • providing monitoring and health surveillance in appropriate cases
  • planning for emergencies.

Most businesses will use substances or materials made from several substances that could cause harm to employees, customers, or the public. Not all hazardous substances are marked and obvious so make sure to check any new products you might use, and risk assess the accordingly.

Further information can be found on HSE’s COSHH website.

DSEAR:

Metallurgical plant, hot metal casting

DSEAR requires an employer to control the risks of fire and explosions.

Dangerous substances can put those who come into contact with that environment at great risk. This could be customers, employees, or the public. DSEAR puts the responsibility on the employer or those who are self-employed to make sure that all risks to those who could be harmed are suitably controlled.

Dangerous substances include anything used or present at work that could, if not properly controlled, cause harm to people as a result of a fire or explosion or corrosion of metal. They can be found in nearly all workplaces and include such things as solvents, paints, varnishes, flammable gases, such as liquid petroleum gas (LPG), dusts from machining and sanding operations, dusts from foodstuffs, pressurised gases, and substances corrosive to metal.

Employers must:

  • find out what dangerous substances are in their workplace and what the risks are
  • put control measures in place to either remove those risks or, where this is not possible, control them
  • put controls in place to reduce the effects of any incidents involving dangerous substances
  • prepare plans and procedures to deal with accidents, incidents and emergencies involving dangerous substances
  • make sure employees are properly informed about and trained to control or deal with the risks from the dangerous substances
  • identify and classify areas of the workplace where explosive atmospheres may occur and avoid ignition sources (from unprotected equipment, for example) in those areas

The Control of Asbestos Regulations:

Man clearing asbestos from old roof / Hazardous substances

The control of asbestos regulations came into place on April 6 2012, and were released to update the previous regulations to take into account the European Commission’s view that the UK had not fully implemented the EU Directive on exposure to asbestos (Directive 2009/148/EC).

Asbestos is responsible for almost 4000 deaths per year in the UK. It was used in a range of building but was commonly used in commercial buildings that were constructed before the year 2000.

The legislation now states that the “duty holder”(who is responsible for the building, so may be the owner or the person in charge of maintenance) must conduct an assessment as to whether the building contains asbestos. If asbestos is present but in good condition and undisturbed it can be left but will need to be closely monitored to avoid it becoming an issue. If asbestos is found within the property and has been disturbed, then you will need to have it removed. Anyone carrying out the work should be properly trained in handling the material and should be aware of the risks involved.

Summary:

COSHH, DSEAR and the control of asbestos are all important when it comes to keeping your workforce safe from hazardous substances and other laws such as the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 set out the responsibility for employers to protect their workers and the public from the effects of exposure to hazardous substances.

A variety of signs on a construction site fence.

Accreditations in construction, which ones do you need?

Accreditations in construction. Which ones do you need?

There are various types of accreditations in construction and knowing which ones your businesses needs to hold can confusing. There are various kinds of accreditation for those in construction, varying across different aspects of the business such as, health & safety, environmental, quality management etc. 

It is not uncommon for accreditations to be a requirement that is asked for during the tendering process, whilst others may not be required but can be a huge benefit to your businesses reputation. 

In this article we will go through the most common types of accreditation for those in the construction industry, where they are required and what kind of businesses would benefit from having them. 

SSIP

SSIP (Safety Scheme in Procurement) is a standard for health & Safety recognised throughout the UK. It is commonly requested by those within the house building industry but can be used for any sector to show health & safety compliance. 

SSIP is completed online and will not require any on site auditing in order for you to pass. Depending on the member scheme you choose the number of questions may vary but for all schemes you will need to meet the core criteria

If you are required to hold an SSIP certificate, SMAS Worksafe can help you to become accredited. For more information visit our packages page

CSCS

CSCS cards provide proof that individuals working on construction sites have the appropriate training and qualifications for the job they do on site. By ensuring the workforce are appropriately qualified the card plays its part in improving standards and safety on UK construction sites.

Holding a CSCS card is not a legislative requirement. It is entirely up to the principal contractor or client whether workers are required to hold a card before they are allowed on site. However, most principal contractors and major house builders require construction workers on their sites to hold a valid card.

CPCS

CPCS (Construction Plant Competence Scheme) is a card scheme that was devised to prove the skills of plant operators. It’s based on a combination of professional competence and health and safety awareness – both essential qualities for plant operators.

All Build UK sites will require you to show your CPCS card and it is being enforced by most employers to show their skills. In some cases an employer might not ask for a CPCS card and certification may be enough to prove your skills. 

ECS

The Electrotechnical Certification Scheme (ECS) is the sole ID and competence card scheme for electrotechnical operatives in the UK and is recognised and endorsed by the industry.

Holding an ECS card proves your qualification status, main electrical occupation, identity, your health and safety awareness, as well as any additional disciplines in which you are skilled to work.

ECS is a partner of the Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS), so anyone in an electrotechnical-related occupation who’s told ‘you need a CSCS card’ will likely need to provide a ECS card.  

SSSTS

Site Supervision Safety Training Scheme (SSSTS) is a course is designed for workers who are set to take on supervisory responsibility at an organisation and need official training and qualifications for the role. 

The course will help individuals to understand: 

  1. health and safety law and how it applies to supervisors
  2. your supervisory responsibilities in controlling site safely
  3. risk assessments and the need for method statements
  4. effective site inductions, toolbox talks and method statement briefings
  5. monitoring site activities effectively
  6. timely intervention when bad practice is identified.

Once passed, the certificate will last for 5 years and you will then need to take a refresher course (SSSTS-R) to maintain certification. If your initial certificate expires you will be required to retake the full course.

SMSTS

The Site Management Safety Training Scheme (SMSTS) is an industry recognised course providing companies who need to meet the ever increasing demand for evidence of health and safety compliance with all the relevant knowledge to meet today’s legislative demands.

The course will give you a full understanding of: 

  1. how to implement all health, safety, welfare and environmental legislation affecting your daily work
  2. how to set up new guidance and industry best practice
  3. your duties and responsibilities with regards to health, safety, welfare and the environment

Once passed, the certificate will last for 5 years and you will then need to take a refresher course (SMSTS-R) to maintain certification. If your initial certificate expires you will be required to retake the full course.  

ISO 14001

ISO 14001 helps businesses of all sizes across all sectors make their day to day operations more sustainable. Sustainability can ultimately save money, improve brand reputation, engage employees and build resilience against uncertainty as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to change. 

Designed for any type of organisation, regardless of its activity or sector, it can provide assurance to company management and employees as well as external stakeholders that environmental impact is being measured and improved.

An ISO is not a require but is recommended for any business that wants to set up, improve and  then maintain an environmental management system to conform with industry regulations and requirements. 

If you are interested or require help with an ISO 140001, you can go to our sister company QMS who will help you meet the criteria and guide you through the process. 

ISO 9001

ISO 9001 is the internationally recognised Quality Management System (QMS) standard that can benefit any size organisation. Designed to be a powerful business improvement tool. 

This standard is based on a number of quality management principles including a strong customer focus, the motivation and implication of top management, the process approach and continual improvement. 

While no company needs an ISO, they may see the benefits of having one when tendering for work. 

If you are interested or require help with an ISO 9001, you can go to our sister company QMS who will help you meet the criteria and guide you through the process. 

Lots of aspects from ISO 9001 can be transferred into ISO 14001. Combining the management systems can increase focus and remove any room for confusion. 

Responsibilities for the combined standards might include:

  1. Drafting a policy statement and quantifiable objectives
  2. Setting up organisational charts and job descriptions
  3. Providing adequate resources
  4. Managing documentation for both standards in a single document control system
  5. Appointing a management representative as well as coordinators for the quality and environmental managements systems

When adding ISO 14001 components to those of ISO 9001, planning must be expanded to deal with environmental impacts, and the inspection and test systems modified to cover environmental conformance. The organisation must meet the environmental expectations of customers and the government, and it must incorporate environmental management elements into internal audit programs and training sessions.

CAS

The Common Assessment Standard is an accreditation designed to standardise the pre-qualification process, helping both clients and contractors improve supply chain efficiency, reduce supply chain risks, and find reliable business opportunities.

Launched by Build UK with the support of CECA in 2019, the Common Assessment Standard has fast become the construction industry’s gold standard for pre-qualification.

The standard is available for all businesses sizes and helps contractors to display compliance across wider criteria such as environmental, financial standings and modern slavery. 

PAS 91

PAS 91 is a standardised pre-qualification questionnaire which has been developed to reduce the need for suppliers to complete a variety of different pre-qualification questionnaires for different, and in some cases, the same clients.

Developed by the British Standards Institute (BSI), the question set has been commissioned by Government and is a recommended common minimum standard for construction procurement.

PAS 91 was originally introduced as mandatory for central government contractors but is now recommended for all principal contractors. 

Asbestos Awareness

Asbestos awareness training should be taken out by anyone that may come into contact with asbestos during the course of any work that they undertake, not just for those who will remove asbestos.

For those that may come into contract with asbestos, this would only need to be asbestos awareness training as opposed to the more detailed training for those that carry out unlicensed or licensed work on asbestos.

If you’re looking for asbestos training visit our partners UKATA. They are a leading asbestos training authority with training centre all over the UK. 

construction building site foreman / contractor

How to source reliable contractors?

Finding reliable contractors is the one area in which all clients and house-builders need to get right. Having issues in your supply chain means work may be finished to a poor standard which will cost you time and money, neither of which will be something you can do when you’re pushed for time to get deadlines met.

The positive sides to finding a good contractor are often great, once the relationship and trust between you has been built you will have often found someone for future projects that you know you can rely on and over time this can lead to a group of contractors that you can use over and over on all your sites.

So how do you find good contractors?

Portals

One of the first areas to look out for clients is via an accreditation portal such as the SMAS Worksafe portal or SSIP portal.  If you’re a client that requires contractors to be accredited to a specific level, then going to a portal is the best starting place.

Once you’re in the portal you can now start to refine your search by the trades you require and look for other areas of compliance that you might require, such as environmental or quality management. We recommended choosing businesses with quality management systems in place, a business that is driven by high-quality work is often likely going to save you time in any snagging processes and are less likely to need their work to be redone due to poor standards.

 

Networking

Contractor and client networking event

Another way to find contractors is through networking at events such as Construction Connects, hosted by SMAS Worksafe. At these ‘meet the buyer’ events, you will have the chance to attend and set up a stool for contractors to come in and talk to you about what upcoming jobs you have and what trades you’ll need for the job or future jobs.

Often these events are local to an area in which you have upcoming projects, so it is a great way for you to easily get more contractors in your contact book and that are interested in the type of work you’re offering. Attending events like this can save you a lot of time browsing portals and searching the web.

 

Try and find a reference

Group of contractors laughing on a wall during break

If you have identified a few contractors that seem suitable for the role and you’re unsure as to which to go with you can ask other clients, you know or some of your current contractors to see if they have had any experience working with them on previous jobs.

You may have contractors working on your site who have experience working with them and they will be able to give you a perspective on their standards of work and how they were to work with. Bringing in a contractor that your current contractors struggle to work with could cause some delays or friction on your sites.

 

Do your research

The final step in your vetting process if you’re still unsure is to do your own research. Look at their website and their reviews and see if you can find any feedback or examples of jobs, they have done in the past that are similar to the one you’re asking them to do.

Not only will you be able to see their reviews and if there are any trends within their reviews, but you’ll also get a feel for the company, what are their ethos and morals? Do they demand high standards?

If you can get the process of sourcing contractors right and you’re able to build up mutual respect you might find yourself with a contractor for life. Then going forward you’ll know you can rely on them to get the work done to a high standard and in good time and develop a strong working relationship that will help both parties.

SMAS Worksafe / Tradepoint annoucement

SMAS Worksafe launch new partnership with TradePoint

Leading SSIP member scheme, SMAS Worksafe have recently announced a new addition to their member benefits in nationwide trade suppliers, TradePoint.

The partnership between will provide SMAS Worksafe members with everyday low prices as well as an additional 10%* off almost everything in TradePoint and B&Q both instore and online giving you access to discounts on over 60,000 products across the entire range.

As part of Kingfisher plc, TradePoint and B&Q supply products and services for every project, all under one roof at convenient locations nationwide. Our range covers building, decorating, electrical, plumbing, tools, hardware, landscaping, timber, joinery, safety, workwear and much more…

Regular TradePoint monthly digital flyers and special offers together with other industry-related articles from SMAS Worksafe will be published to keep members abreast of the latest news.

Commenting on the new partnership, Lee Taylor, National Customer Account Partner, TradePoint stated “We are delighted to partner with SMAS Worksafe and look forward to the members fully benefitting from the discount instore and online”

Partnership Manager at SMAS Worksafe, Sammy Jolly said of the partnership, “This is a really fantastic opportunity for SMAS Worksafe members to benefit from a 10% discount on their purchases, especially during these tough times.”

Tradepoint LogoSMAS Worksafe - coloured logo

SMAS Worksafe Exclusive – No Minimum Spend

As a TradePoint member through SMAS Worksafe you can use the 10% discount at any time with no minimum spend. Simply scan your TradePoint card at any till point including self-scan to trigger your discount or online by activating your TradePoint account.

Can be used in conjunction with offers

You can use your SMAS Worksafe TradePoint card on top of all existing offers in-store to get even bigger discounts.

Discount for all your employees

Only available to TradePoint members through SMAS Worksafe. To join TradePoint or order a replacement card complete the order form at the top of this page. To complete, members need to log in to their dashboard and complete the form.

Priority Service with One Hour Click and Collect

Choose and pay for products* online then they’ll be ready to collect from your local store an hour later. Selected products/locations. Restrictions apply.

Free Bulk Delivery

Pick a delivery date to suit you including Saturdays. Wide delivery coverage around the UK. Minimum spend £100. Selected products/locations. Restrictions apply.

Trade Credit

Up to 60 days to pay interest-free. Ask in store for details.

Special Orders

Even if they don’t stock a product it doesn’t mean TradePoint can’t get it for you. This includes staircases, roof trusses, aggregates, and made to measure windows and doors.

Timber Cutting in Selected Stores

TradePoint’s trained timber cutters are on hand to cut your materials to size. From skirting to worktops, there’s no need to book, and they can cut up to 2440 x 1220mm. The first 15 cuts are free.

Brick Matching

Help finding the closest brick match possible – it doesn’t matter how many bricks you need or how unusual they are.

Paint Mixing

Any colour, any finish available in Valspar trade point – formulated with the professional in mind. Ask in store for details.

To get your TradePoint card login to your SMAS Worksafe account and head to the Worksafe Benefits tab within the portal or contact SMAS Worksafe on 01752 697370 or email info@smasltd.com.

SMAS Worksafe TradePoint portal

This pain is getting worser by the hour

Managing occupational risks

Occupational risks occur when someone’s job leads them to greater risks. For example, a Landscaper or gardener that spends lots of time outdoors will have a greater risk of issues caused by direct sunlight.

Like many occupational risks they are hard to avoid, a landscaper’s job requires them to work outside and therefore trying to reduce the risks through less exposure would ultimately impact their job and cost them money.

Types of hazards:

All jobs come with risks to employees, although some may seem more obvious and dangerous than others. Jobs that may be seen as having no risks,  such as working in an office still hold risks for an employee’s mental and physical health and should be considered when you’re setting up a workstation and working environment.

Common types of occupational risks:Businesswoman having back pain / occupational risks

  • Biological: Often causes by viruses, bacteria, insects or animals.
  • Chemical: Caused by the use or exposure to substances
  • Physical: Environmental factors that can cause damage to a worker; heights, noise, radiation etc.
  • Safety: The creation of unsafe working environment; exposed wires or moving vehicles
  • Ergonomic: Physical factors that can result in musculoskeletal injuries; poor workstation setup
  • Psychological: Hazards that can cause an employee to suffer from mental health issues; stress, sexual harassment, violence etc.

 

Managing hazards in the workplace:

Failing to protect your employee’s wellbeing could lead you to face financial and/or custodial penalties. Therefore, it is vital that you make sure you do your utmost to manage all workplace hazards.

Here are some of the steps you should take to help identify and reduce occupational risks:

Work Injury / Occupational risks

  • Carry out an appropriate risk assessment: if you are struggling with all the risks it may be worth asking employees and or other businesses like yours to help you.
  • Introduce the control measures: once you have identified the risks to your staff you will need to implement the measures to reduce the risks. This could be avoiding the use of ladders to stop falls or be to supply workers with PPE if they’re working with dust or fumes.
  • Train your employees: All employees should have at least level 1 health and safety training or office safety training. You will also need to have specific training if the workplace requires it. For example, how to deal with asbestos.

 

The Regulations:

While there isn’t a specific legal requirement, much of what is considered to be health regulations are covered in other employment laws. Most of the occupational health and safety regulations are covered in the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. However, as there is such a variety of hazards it is important that businesses include their own risks assessment for hazards or risks that are unique to their industry.

For example, for those who are often exposed to chemicals that could lead to dermatitis, The HSE published a leaflet on preventing contact dermatitis and urticaria (another skin disease) at work, which includes reference to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations.

For all cases, you should try and prevent the issues rather than cure it once it has happened. Occupational health regulations often highlight the importance of carrying out a thorough risk assessment and addressing any potential risks in advance to avoid workplace illness and injury.

 

SMAS Worksafe and SSIP:

Managing occupational risks can be hard, which is where an SSIP accreditation from SMAS Worksafe can help your business. A health and safety accreditation from SMAS Worksafe will help your business to identify all risks to your workforce and give you action plans on how you can make your business safer going forward.

To learn more about how SMAS Worksafe can help your business with an SSIP certificate, visit our SSIP accreditation page.

Concept of risk management control circle

Understanding RAMS: Risk Assessment Method Statements

In the United Kingdom, it is an employer’s requirement to protect your employees, and others who come into your workplace from harm and therefore using RAMS (risk assessment method statements) is a great way to identify and reduce incidents occurring.

Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, the minimum requirement

Risk management process

for employers is to:

  • identify what could cause injury or illness in your business (hazards)
  • decide how likely it is that someone could be harmed and how seriously (the risk)
  • take action to eliminate the hazard, or if this isn’t possible, control the risk

There are multiple steps to reducing risks in your workplace and assessing the risks is just one part of the overall control and mitigation process.

For most small, low-risk businesses the steps you need to take are straightforward and are explained below.

 

Taking steps to reduce risks.

Risk management is a step-by-step process for controlling health and safety risks caused by hazards in the workplace.

You can do it yourself or appoint a competent person to help you.

  • Identify hazards
  • Assess the risks
  • Control the risks
  • Record your findings
  • Review the controls

 

Identify hazards

Look around your workplace and think about what may cause harm (these are called hazards).

Think about:

  • how people work and how plants and equipment are used
  • what chemicals and substances are used
  • what safe or unsafe work practices exist
  • the general state of your premises

Use your accident and ill-health records to help you to identify risks that might occur in the future. If there is a history or a trend of injuries within a workplace then use that information to stop or reduce the risks of them going forward. Take account of non-routine operations, such as maintenance, cleaning or changes in production cycles.

Think about hazards to health, such as manual handling, use of chemicals and causes of work-related stress.

For each hazard, think about how employees, contractors, visitors or members of the public might be harmed.

Talk to workers

Involve your employees, as an employer you might not have a deep understanding of all the day to day tasks other people are doing and therefore what risks they face. Asking them for input will only help you create a more complete risk assessment.

 

Vulnerable workers

Some workers might have specific requirements, for example, young workers, migrant workers, new or expectant mothers and people with disabilities. You should think about the requirements for all of your workforce and as mentioned previously, if you’re unsure ask them for input.

 

Assess the risks

Once you have identified the hazards, decide how likely it is that someone could be harmed and how serious

Construction site safety notices on wooden fence

it could be. This is assessing the level of risk.

The key factors:

  • Who might be harmed and how
  • What you’re already doing to control the risks
  • What further action you need to take to control the risks
  • Who needs to carry out the action
  • When the action is needed by
  • Control the risks
  • Look at what you’re already doing, and the controls you already have in place.

 

Things you should ask yourself:

  • Can I get rid of the hazard altogether?
  • If not, how can I control the risks so that harm is unlikely?
  • If you need further controls, consider:
  • redesigning the job
  • replacing the materials, machinery or process
  • organising your work to reduce exposure to the materials, machinery or process
  • identifying and implementing practical measures needed to work safely
  • providing personal protective equipment and making sure workers wear it

Once you have considered all the risks your next task is to put the controlling measures you have identified in place. You’re not expected to eliminate all risks, but you need to do everything ‘reasonably practicable’ to protect people from harm. This means balancing the level of risk against the measures needed to control the real risk in terms of money, time or trouble.

You can find more detailed guidance on controls relevant to your business and our in-house assessment team will also give you suggestions on anything they feel is missing.

Record your findings

If you employ 5 or more people, you must record your significant findings, these include.

  • the hazards (things that may cause harm)
  • who might be harmed and how
  • what you are doing to control the risks
  • To help you, we have a risk assessment template and examples. Do not rely purely on paperwork as your main priority should be to control the risks in practice.

 

Review your controlling measures

Once the controlling measures have been put in place you must review them to make sure they are working as you would have hoped. You should also review them if any of the following scenarios could take place:

  • they may no longer be effective
  • there are changes in the workplace that could lead to new risks such as changes to staff, a process, the substances or equipment used
  • also consider a review if your workers have spotted any problems or there have been any accidents or near misses.

Update your risk assessment record with any changes you make.

 

Templates and examples

Here are some example scenarios from the HSE as to whether having a risk assessment would apply to your business or job role, especially for those who are self-employed. You can also find templates for work specific risk assessments on the HSE website.

Accountant – I am a self-employed accountant and I am proposing to take on a work placement student, will the law apply to me?

Yes, you will have duties as an employer and will need to take steps to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of your employees.

 

Employer – I am an employer, will this affect the way in which I manage sub-contractors?

No, as an employer you have duties under health and safety law to satisfy yourself that the contractor you choose can do the job safely and without risks to health. The proposed changes will not alter the duties you as an employer have to contractors.

 

Hairdresser – I’m a self-employed hairdresser, does the law apply to me?

If you use bleaching agents or similar chemicals then yes, the law will apply to you. If you are simply washing and cutting hair, then health and safety law will no longer apply.

 

Dressmaker – I work at home altering garments and making soft furnishings, does the law apply to me?

No, health and safety law will not apply to you.

 

Photographer – I take photographs of weddings and special occasions for clients which means that sometimes they visit my studio to discuss arrangements; does the law apply to me?

No, health and safety law will not apply to you.

 

Artist – I produce cards, gifts and pictures for sale at markets and fairs, does the law apply to me?

No, health and safety law will not apply to you.

 

Baker – I run a cake business from home, does the law apply to me?

No, health and safety law will not apply to you.

 

Office work – I work in an office at home, does the law apply to me?

It doesn’t depend on whether you’re at home; it is the work activity that matters. So, if you’re working on a client’s accounts, the law will no longer apply. If you’re writing a manual, which someone will use to operate machinery, then the law will still apply.

 

Advice – I am a health and safety consultant and visit clients to give advice, does the law apply to me?

Yes, your clients will act on your advice and this affects how other people do their job.

 

Landlords – I let rooms and properties to tenants; does the law apply to me?

Yes, you have specific responsibilities under the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations

 

For the full Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 use the link below.

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1999/3242/contents/made

SMAS and CCBD partnership announcement

SMAS Worksafe adds CCBD Ltd to their affiliate partners

SMAS Worksafe, one of the leading SSIP member schemes, are pleased to announce the partnership with CCBD Ltd.

SMAS Worksafe are delighted with the partnership and are happy to be able to bring our members greater opportunities for ongoing or future construction projects that CCBD will be looking to source for their clients.

CCBD will be able to call upon SMAS Worksafe members to fill tendering opportunities for their clients, helping us to support of members with work opportunities should they be available and within a suitable location radius.CCBD Logo, affiliate SMAS Worksafe Partner

CCBD services support Main Contractors, Sub Contractors along with numerous Developers & Local Authorities across the country.  CCBD services create and solidify relations, partnerships and opportunities that support company growth. ​Subcontractor services provide the support of a full team pushing their business growth via gaining new clients and supporting them with securing new work.  Main Contractors, Developers & Local Authorities services provides a streamlined system when it comes to managing supply chains, procurement and tender process across current and upcoming projects.

Commenting on the new partnership, Chris Cordner, Managing Director, CCBD Ltd stated “We are very pleased to be partnering with SMAS Worksafe and it’s a great achievement for CCBD to be recognised for the support we are providing the Construction Industry.

CCBD & SMAS together is going to be very exciting for Construction and will support hundreds of Main & Sub Contractors throughout the UK.”

Commercial Director at SMAS Worksafe, Chris Woodward-Biddle said of the partnership, “SMAS Worksafe are delighted to support CCBD as the SSIP accreditation scheme of choice for their members.

CCBD’s mission to match high quality trades with pre-qualified tender opportunities is a natural match with the goals of SSIP and SMAS WorkSafe in reducing the burden of pre-tender accreditation for both main contractors and sub-contractors.

We look forward to working with CCBD and their members, and continuing to drive forward the highest standards in Health & Safety pre-qualification in the Construction Industry.”

SMAS Worksafe PQQ

Worksafe Assist – achieve compliance

Take the first steps to becoming an environmentally friendly business with the help and support of SMAS Worksafe’s Assist membership package.

If you take out our Worksafe PQQ accreditation but require more help with your businesses environmental procedures then Assist is the package for you.

Why choose Assist?

  • Construction businesses are increasingly asked to demonstrate sustainable processes
  • Many UK businesses do not have the time or expertise to do this themselves
  • SMAS Worksafe can produce a practical environmental management system for a business to use, at a fraction of the price you would pay a consultant
  • As an Assist customer, you will also receive check-ins from one of our environmental assessors and an annual health check to ensure your processes remain relevant.

Literally, everything we do has an impact on the environment.

From removing vegetation during groundworks, or purchasing a new vehicle, the choices we make have a wide range of impacts on the environment.

Environmental management is the framework and processes that a business can implement so that it can understand what it does that causes an impact on the environment and how it can reduce those effects.

Driving vehicles, extracting materials, removing waste products from site – all of these things have the potential to impact the environment in some way; whether that be as a consequence on air, water, atmosphere or wildlife. It is more important than ever that UK construction businesses understand what they can do to reduce or eliminate the negative impacts it might have.

Almost every business we speak to wants to do the right thing but just does not have the time or expertise to know how to change things. Here is where we can help…

We completely understand that implementing an environmental management system can be time-consuming and confusing. We also know that the perception of many Worksafe members is that it can also be very expensive.

That is where we are here to help.

Members who want to put in place a practical, easy to follow, environmental management system can now apply to take up our ASSIST package of support.

Once signed up, one of our expert environmental assessors will contact you for a brief interview and after that, they will go away to produce you a working management system that you can implement into your business right away. We will take into account the size of your business and the work you carry out to ensure that the outcome is that you are provided with a management system that is affordable to put into practice and which will give your clients (existing and prospective) confidence that you do the right thing and can meet the sustainable obligations in your contracts.

Speak to a member of our team about how you can benefit from Assist!  

And start your environmental journey to becoming a sustainable UK business.

Construction Worker With Hi-Visibility Safety Jacket and Hard Hat SMAS Worksafe and building a safer future

SMAS Worksafe backs Building a Safer Future!

SMAS Worksafe are thrilled to announce that they are now a registered signatory of Building a Safer Future promoting the safety of buildings in the UK.

SMAS Worksafe is a registered member of SSIP (Safety Schemes in Procurement) which helps businesses to reach their health & safety requirements. We pride ourselves on our excellent customer service and making sure we can do the utmost to help businesses to be compliant.

In April of last year, the UK Government encouraged industry-wide commitment to sign-up to a Charter, in its response to the ‘Building a Safer Future’ consultation ‘A reformed building safety regulatory system’.

In early 2020, the Considerate Constructors Scheme (CCS) was appointed to develop and manage the Charter. The CCS has established a new, not-for-profit organisation (Building a Safer Future Ltd) with an independent governance structure, to lead and develop the Charter.

Building a Safer Future is driving culture and behaviour change in the safety of the building environment and is essential to putting people’s safety first. In driving this change, the BSF Charter will seek to provide the industry and public with:

  • An engaged online community where good practice on building safety is shared and relevant examples, case studies and other resources are signposted through a Learning & Excellence Hub.
  • A public and workforce engagement portal for anyone (public, resident, other building users, those working across the built environment) to raise building safety concerns in relation to projects registered and verified with the BSF Charter. (To be launched end 2020).
  • Benchmarking and verification (working closely with and learning from the ‘Responsible Care’ benchmarking approach adopted by the chemical industry). (To be launched end 2020).

SMAS Worksafe are delighted to have become a registered signatory and share the key value of putting people’s safety first, above all other priorities.

Chris Woodward-Biddle, Commercial Director at SMAS Worksafe is thrilled with the new partnership.

“It’s great to become a registered signatory of BSF, their values and ethos of making sure every individual’s safety comes first is something we share and backing their message is something we’re proud of and take very seriously when helping our members with their safety.